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Vegan. Ex-makeup artist. CFS/ME sufferer. Cares about human rights, equality, animal rights, conservation/climate change.

Chitika

Tuesday, 26 December 2017

Becoming a Vegan Makeup Artist: Storage and Organisation

So now you have all the stuff you need to be a vegan makeup artist, you're gonna need somewhere to put it. That 'somewhere' will need to be easy to carry and travel with as you travel to and from jobs.

The Zuca Bag was my kit bag of choice for most of my career. It's sturdy, on wheels, and the fabric part is washable for when something inevitably spills. The Pro Artist Bag comes with clear plastic inserts to organise your kit. It's also suitable to take on a plane as carry-on luggage. 




The £229+ price tag is pretty steep, so if you aren't likely to be jetting off with it, you might want to consider the cheaper Zuca Sport.



This comes without the inserts, but you can buy your own clear plastic cases to separate products by type. Clear cases are vital - you need to be able to see what you have quickly without rummaging around! This'll set you back by around £130+. I highly recommend the model with flashing wheels!

For your hair kit, the Zuca Artist backpack is ideal. It's designed to sit on top of the Zuca Bag, it has removable pouches and a thermal pocket so you can put away hot curling irons safely. 




I know these cases are expensive, but I've done my research and carried other cases, and honestly, these are the sturdiest, most hardwearing, most user-friendly cases available. They aren't even paying me to say this! I've linked the cheapest UK shop I've found, as prices vary a lot between retailers. 

If you happen to find yourself in a state of monetary deficit, as I often do, then a second hand Zuca is ideal. As the fabric inserts are removable and washable, you'll have no problem getting your case clean and looking like new again. 


  • Organisation
Your kit should be arranged by type. Each category should have its own place, normally a medium clear PVC bag. My kit categories were as follows;

  1. Skincare, including wipes, tissues and cotton pads (kept in the door pockets of my Zuca)
  2. Foundations, concealer palette, setting powder & single blush/highlight/contours
  3. Airbrush foundation minis (came in their own small PVC bag)
  4. Single eyeshadow pigments, gel liners and cream shadows
  5. Eye pencils and mascara (kept in a small PVC pencil bag or wallet)
  6. Lipsticks and lip palette
  7. Lip Pencils (kept in a small PVC pencil bag or wallet)
  8. Liquid lipsticks/glosses (kept in a small PVC pencil bag or wallet)
  9. Large Palettes (kept at the bottom of my Zuca, under everything to stop them moving around and getting broken)
  10. Disposable lip brushes, mascara wands, and cotton buds (in small Cozette vessels or wallets)
  11. Powder/foundation brushes and eye brushes (in large Cozette vessels or tube holder)
  12. Nail polishes, file and clippers (just those I'll need, not my full collection, kept in a small PVC case in my Zuca's side pocket)
  • Pro Picks
Here are some bits that I think are pretty nifty.

Magnetic Palettes - 



Pic via etsy.com

I no longer support Z-palette after the owner went on a bit of an Instagram rampage insulting customers, and these are some great alternatives.

Pic via love-makeup.co.uk
These clear plastic palettes are perfect for melting cream products into or storing bobby pins or lashes.


On set or location, it's not possible to take your entire kit with you for touch-ups. This is where a set bag is useful to have the essentials on hand. This one has a tissue dispenser built in, and will keep things dry if it rains on location!
Pic via love-makeup.co.uk


When working on a single job for extended periods, such as a film or TV series, it is often necessary to organise each actor's particular products and shades separately. 


So there you have it, you now know all you need to become a vegan makeup artist and hairstylist. The most important thing, when you're learning, is to practice constantly! Makeover all your friends, take pictures, track your progress, take notice of your timing. Get a couple of hairdressing practice heads to practice your techniques on. It's best to get the highest percentage of human hair as you can afford, because synthetic is too slippery and not realistic. (For anyone wondering about the vegan-ity of human hair - humans can give consent, animals cannot!)

I have now imparted my wisdom, bestowed it upon you. Use it wisely. For now, I must bid you farewell. If I ever manage to claw back some precious health, I fully intend to continue this blog! If you'd like more info on my illness and to perhaps donate towards research for a cure, click here.

Til Next Time,

Emma
xXx

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